Call for Papers: “Racism and Transnationality” of the “Transnational Social Review – A Social Work Journal” (TSR).

Guest editors Caroline Schmitt, Linda L. Semu and Matthias D. Witte

Deadline for submission of proposals is October 15, 2016.

In many countries, right-wing parties such as French National Front (FN) in France or Alternative for Germany (AFD) in Germany, racist movements, anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant racism are on the rise. In the U.S. ongoing discussions about racist discrimination of Black people got stoked up with critical fatal shootings from White policemen against Blacks. The rejection of refugees and attacks on refugee accommodations in Europe henpeck the political discussions and media attention. Questions such as “who belongs to a nation, who is welcome and who is not?” are discussed with great commotion of the population, who controversially argues about “nation-state cultures” and people supposed to be “the others”. These developments take place simultaneously in different countries – and should be taken into account in their interweaving, e.g. if transnational networks exist between racist movements in different countries. The coincidences of various racist discourses and attacks raise up the question how racial ideologies and practices spread, interact and transform across territorial borders and growing parts of society. At the same time, such developments encounter various resistance and protest of civil society and professionals engaged in anti-racist issues.

Race is a social construct, which distinguishes between people and groups on the basis of given or constructed differences. It ascribes difference to supposedly biological lineages of humans and/or perceived cultural varieties. Differences are maximized and essentialized creating positions of an “us” and a “them”. This binary group structure leads to a hierarchy that positions one group as superior over the inferior “other” group. Racism is not only limited to the individual level, but is institutionally and linguistically incorporated into societal structures. While mechanisms and categorization processes of racism are topics of interdisciplinary research, racism is only rarely discussed in its transnational dimensions.

This special issue on “Racism and Transnationality” aims to further pry this desideratum and to capture worldwide dynamics related to racism. It seeks to give an insight into trends and developments in different countries, and into forms of racism, which interact, transcend and transform across territorial borders. A transnational perspective on racism faces precisely on those translation processes, which emerge over time and space in different contexts.

We invite both empirical and theoretical papers, which focus on(but may not be limited to) one or more of the following questions:

Racism across borders: How do ideologies of racism spread worldwide, cross (national) borders and endure or even refine? How do processes of racialization interact with categories such as nationality, ethnicity, class, gender, disability, or religion?

Ambivalences in a transnationalized world: How is the resurgence of anti-immigrant nationalist and populist political movements in different countries related to an increasing globalization – with its free-flow of knowledge and capital on one side and the simultaneous limitation of people’s movements on the other side?

Forms of racism in transnational networks: Which forms of racism get promoted by racist movements and collectives? Where can we observe historical pathways and where and how does racism transform itself? Which kind of transnational networking exists between racist movements and how do these networks advance the upturn of racism as societal figure?

Anti-racist engagement: As a way out of racism, which different anti-racist-approaches exist and which requirements do they impose upon social work?

Requirements for Submissions

Each proposal abstract should contain no more than 500 words and should address the following: background of the proposed article; content outline; and main discussion points.

For those proposals that are accepted, the deadline for submission of full articles is January 23, 2017. The deadlines for the TSR issue focusing on “Racism and Transnationality” are:

  • October 15, 2016 Submission of proposal abstracts
  • January 23, 2017 Submission of full articles
  • February – April 2017 Peer review
  • April – June 2017 Revision of articles, if necessary
  • June 5, 2017 Final submission of publishable articles
  • September 2017 Publication

Articles should be up to 8,000 words in length. The authors are responsible for submitting proofread and anonymized manuscripts. The instructions for authors are available HERE:

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rtsr20&page=instructions#.U6gIxIRhCCg

For more information on the journal TSR, please visit the homepage:

www.tandfonline.com/loi/rtsr20

Contact
Inquiries and proposals should be sent to the guest editors via email:

Caroline Schmitt
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

schmica@uni-mainz.de

Linda L. Semu
McDaniel College Westminster

lsemu@mcdaniel.edu

Matthias D. Witte
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

matthias.witte@uni-mainz.de

CfP_Racism_and_Transnationality_TSR

EDITOR WHO GREW UP BLACK IN NAZI GERMANY DIES

image

Hans-Jürgen Massaquoi, Sr.

MIAMI (AP) — Hans Massaquoi, a former managing editor of Ebony magazine who wrote a distinctive memoir about his unusual childhood growing up black in Nazi Germany, has died. He was 87. His son said Massaquoi died Saturday, on his 87th birthday, in Jacksonville. He had been hospitalized over the Christmas holidays. “He had quite a journey in life,” said Hans J. Massaquoi, Jr., of Detroit. “Many have read his books and know what he endured. But most don’t know that he was a good, kind, loving, fun-loving, fair, honest, generous, hard-working and open-minded man. He respected others and commanded respect himself. He was dignified and trustworthy

. We will miss him forever and try to live by his example.” In an interview in 2000, the elder Massaquoi told The Associated Press that he credited the late Alex Haley, author of “Roots,” with convincing him to share his experience of being “both an insider in Nazi Germany and, paradoxically, an endangered outsider.” His autobiography, “Destined to Witness: Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany,” was published in the U.S. in 1999 and a German translation was also published. Massaquoi’s mother was a German nurse and his father was the son of a Liberian diplomat. He grew up in working class neighborhoods of the port city of Hamburg.

Read More

Abschied von Hans-Jürgen Massaquoi

image

Hans-Jürgen Massaquoi, Sr.

Der in Hamburg geborene Autor des Bestsellers “Neger, Neger, Schornsteinfeger” ist kurz vor seinem 87. Geburtstag in Florida gestorben.Hamburg. Hans-Jürgen Massaquoi, in Hamburg geborener amerikanischer Journalist und Buchautor, ist in Florida gestorben. Das erfuhr das Abendblatt von dessen Freund Ralph Giordano. Massaquoi, schwer erkrankt, hätte am 19. Januar seinen 87. Geburtstag feiern können.

Er, der Deutschland 1948 verlassen hatte, wurde der deutschen Öffentlichkeit 1999 bekannt, als er den ersten Band seiner Lebenserinnerungen veröffentlichte, die zum Bestseller wurden: “Neger, Neger, Schornsteinfeger” heißt das Buch nach den Spottrufen, mit denen die hellhäutigen Kinder den dunkelhäutigen Sohn eines liberianischen Diplomatensprosses und einer Hamburger Krankenschwester hänselten. Sein Großvater war liberianischer Generalkonsul in Hamburg, seinen Vater hat er nie kennengelernt.

Read More